Can a child have basal cell carcinoma?

BASAL CELL carcinoma (BCC) in children is rare. Cases of BCC in the pediatric population have been reported in association with basal cell nevus syndrome,1 xeroderma pigmentosum,2 and nevus sebaceus3 and after high-dose radiotherapy.

How common is basal cell carcinoma in children?

Non-melanoma skin cancers appear to be the most often malignant tumors. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for 75% of non-melonoma skin cancers and peaks in the seventh decade [1]. Although it is frequent in the elderly, BCC is extremely rare in children under 15 years of age.

What is basal cell carcinoma for kids?

Basal cell carcinoma.

It’s a very treatable cancer. It starts in the basal cell layer of the skin (epidermis) and grows very slowly. The cancer usually appears as a small, shiny bump or nodule on the skin. It occurs mainly on areas exposed to the sun, such as the head, neck, arms, hands, and face.

What are the symptoms of skin cancer in children?

What are the symptoms of skin cancer in a child?

  • A small, raised bump that is shiny or pearly, and may have small blood vessels.
  • A small, flat spot that is scaly, irregularly shaped, and pale, pink, or red.
  • A spot that bleeds easily, then heals and appears to go away, then bleeds again in a few weeks.
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Who is most likely to get basal cell carcinoma?

The risk of basal cell carcinoma is higher among people who freckle or burn easily or who have very light skin, red or blond hair, or light-colored eyes. Increasing age. Because basal cell carcinoma often takes decades to develop, the majority of basal cell carcinomas occur in older adults.

When should I worry about a mole on my child?

If a mole bleeds without reason, however, it should be checked. A mole that looks like an open sore is also worrisome. Bleeding or a break in the skin can be a sign of melanoma. Bottom line: If your child has a mole that starts to bleed or looks like an open sore, a dermatologist should examine the mole.

Is Basal Cell Carcinoma common in teens?

Nonmelanoma skin cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are extremely rare in children and teens.

Can a 7 year old get melanoma?

It’s technically possible for a young child to get melanoma, but it’s vanishingly rare. Only about 400 cases of melanoma a year affect Americans under 20. Melanoma is a serious type of skin cancer that develops when melanocytes (the cells that give the skin its pigmentation, or color) grow out of control.

What does pediatric melanoma look like?

While melanoma in adults tends to turn darker, it is often whitish, yellowish, or pink in children. The most common symptoms of melanoma include: A bump on the skin that itches or bleeds. A wart-like spot that is typically yellowish, whitish, or pink.

How fast does basal cell carcinoma grow?

The tumors enlarge very slowly, sometimes so slowly that they go unnoticed as new growths. However, the growth rate varies greatly from tumor to tumor, with some growing as much as ½ inch (about 1 centimeter) in a year. Basal cell carcinomas rarely spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body.

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Can kids get cancer?

The types of cancers that occur most often in children are different from those seen in adults. The most common cancers of children are: Leukemia. Brain and spinal cord tumors.

Are skin cancers itchy?

Skin cancers often don’t cause bothersome symptoms until they have grown quite large. Then they may itch, bleed, or even hurt. But typically they can be seen or felt long before they reach this point.

Is it a pimple or basal cell carcinoma?

Basal cell carcinoma is the type of skin cancer that most commonly may look like a pimple. The visible parts of basal cell carcinoma lesions are often small, red bumps that may bleed or ooze if picked at. This may look similar to a pimple. However, after it’s “popped,” a skin cancer will return in the same spot.

Can you pick off a basal cell carcinoma?

Yes, you might be able to pick this crusty lesion off with your fingers. But it would grow back. The right thing to do is see a dermatologist and have it removed.

What does basal cell carcinoma look like when it starts?

At first, a basal cell carcinoma comes up like a small “pearly” bump that looks like a flesh-colored mole or a pimple that doesn’t go away. Sometimes these growths can look dark. Or you may also see shiny pink or red patches that are slightly scaly. Another symptom to watch out for is a waxy, hard skin growth.